Author Topic: Manchester Council to give most vulnerable housing priority  (Read 245 times)

celeste

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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-manchester-48621277


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Manchester has more than 65,000 social rent homes, about 30% of all housing stock in the city

Manchester's "most vulnerable people" are to be given priority for rehousing under new council plans.

The city's council is reviewing its social housing policy, which it said currently allows anyone to apply for housing, "regardless of their need".

As a result, 15,000 households have applied for the estimated 2,200 homes expected to become available by 2020.

Councillor Suzanne Richards said it was "vital" the system helped people in crisis or facing homelessness first.

The review proposes a change to who will qualify to join the social housing register and to the priority level awarded to those accepted, to ensure the best use is made of the housing stock across the city.




A council spokesman said the changes were needed as "unlike many areas, Manchester allows anyone to put their name on the register, regardless of their need".
« Last Edit: 21:34:06, 13/06/19 by celeste »
All that's necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing

Parky

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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-manchester-48621277


 GMP

Image caption
Manchester has more than 65,000 social rent homes, about 30% of all housing stock in the city

Manchester's "most vulnerable people" are to be given priority for rehousing under new council plans.

The city's council is reviewing its social housing policy, which it said currently allows anyone to apply for housing, "regardless of their need".

As a result, 15,000 households have applied for the estimated 2,200 homes expected to become available by 2020.

Councillor Suzanne Richards said it was "vital" the system helped people in crisis or facing homelessness first.

The review proposes a change to who will qualify to join the social housing register and to the priority level awarded to those accepted, to ensure the best use is made of the housing stock across the city.




A council spokesman said the changes were needed as "unlike many areas, Manchester allows anyone to put their name on the register, regardless of their need".

Parky

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Can someone please explain what exactly “vulnerable people “ means ?

celeste

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Homeless, people who have no chance of earning a living perhaps due to low IQ, people who have been put back into society after being in an institution
« Last Edit: 08:00:49, 14/06/19 by celeste »
All that's necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing

St Chads Lad

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One way to qualify should be an ability to pay the rent, that'd be good.  ???

sofcookies

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Social Housing should be exactly that, Social Housing.  An ability to pay the rent shouldn't really be the bar we set in this country to somebody getting a roof over there heads.  There should be other means to force people to put themselves in a position to do that once they are in a stable environment.


Those who then do not take the help offered should be moved into lower quality social housing or shared accomodation.  Social housing should be used to help the most vulnerable to get back on their feet and off the streets and then off benefits. 


It has to be joined up thinking though and the cuts to Mental ill Health awareness schemes across Manchester and surrounding areas means any chance of really tackling Greater Manchester's homeless epidemic is likely doomed to fail. 





St Chads Lad

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I wasn't suggesting that ability to pay should be the bar I meant there are people who work, young couples with families, that fall between getting a living wage and qualifying for any help, that are forced to pay high rents to private landlords, I know a few, and I happen to believe that a proportion of people on the streets choose to live that way, and I think there's a large number of people who don't want to give up benefits and find work.  :)
« Last Edit: 12:41:32, 15/06/19 by St Chads Lad »

sofcookies

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I agree that some people on the streets do choose to live that way and there is an even bigger problem with the pretend homeless.  Metrolink helps with free travel into the city centre and back out again once the days begging has finished.


The situation isn't perfect for anybody but getting a real grip on those who are the least capable in society for me is getting close to crisis point.  Social housing is one way to lift people.  Without the social funding though it cannot work on it's own and with funding being cut in other areas it isn't going to be an easy fix. 


Being trapped with high rents in unfit conditions is awful and can be hard to get out of but there will never be enough low rent housing in this country due to the capitalist system we live in.  Private landlord system in the UK is definately something which needs to be over-hauled but that would be another thread :)  ;D