Author Topic: Cheetham/Hill 1950s/60s?  (Read 484243 times)

Greengate Girl

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Re: Cheetham/Hill 1950s/60s?
« Reply #15 on: 12:09:20, 03/01/11 »
Good photos Tony. Thanksxxxxx
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cheethamgirl

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Re: Cheetham/Hill 1950s/60s?
« Reply #16 on: 12:14:08, 03/01/11 »
Wonderful pics.  many thanks.  I'll try to scan the one I have and upload it. Don't hold your breathe tho!   ;D
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tony dixon

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Re: Cheetham/Hill 1950s/60s?
« Reply #17 on: 12:41:43, 03/01/11 »
.....and one for luck

« Last Edit: 12:03:07, 08/01/13 by Chris »

celeste

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Re: Cheetham/Hill 1950s/60s?
« Reply #18 on: 18:48:22, 03/01/11 »
Anyone been to the Grapes Inn, I used to go there frequently for lunch in the 1990's - Jenny Frost (Atomic Kitten) is the landlord's grandaughter
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cheethamgirl

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Re: Cheetham/Hill 1950s/60s?
« Reply #19 on: 19:54:25, 04/01/11 »
Tony, this photo really took me back.  I remember Eve Abrams ladies wear (and corset) shop and also Halon's menswear.  Gordon's fish shop had a large front sash window, which the fishmonger used to lift up fully open in summer, allowing the flies to descend on the fish, the lucky ones that is, - those which did not get caught on the fly papers first (remember fly papers?).     :P
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tony dixon

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Re: Cheetham/Hill 1950s/60s?
« Reply #20 on: 13:11:30, 05/01/11 »
I certainly do remember fly papers - we had them all over the house - but do you remember " Emergency Ward 10 "

Take a look at this.

« Last Edit: 12:05:44, 08/01/13 by Chris »

cheethamgirl

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Re: Cheetham/Hill 1950s/60s?
« Reply #21 on: 16:32:00, 05/01/11 »
I do indeed, Tony, with Charles Tingwell and Glyn Houston as doctors.  There was a Frederick Bartman, who left the series, became an antiques dealer and went to prison for murder (in real life).  I remember a buxom blonde sister, but can't remember her name.  Dr Kildare was the American equivalent.  I remember the early days of tv, when it didn't start until teatime.  Watch with Mother; Bill & Ben Flowerpot men; the Wooden tops; Pictue Book.  I recall the first episode of Corrie - which they showed again before Christmas and I really enjoyed it, despite the naff acting and wobbly sets.  Remember Magnolia St, which was an attempt by the other channel to cash in on Corrie's success, but it flopped.
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tony dixon

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Re: Cheetham/Hill 1950s/60s?
« Reply #22 on: 19:36:21, 05/01/11 »
Jill Browne played Carole Young the, as you say, buxom blonde nurse - she was the main reason us blokes tuned in.  :smitten:

What I didn't realise was that they made a film of it and it was showing at the Premier at that time - must have gone to the Temple that week.

CityLad

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Re: Cheetham/Hill 1950s/60s?
« Reply #23 on: 22:36:03, 30/01/11 »
Reading this thread has brought back so many memories especially of bagels from the Jewish bakery, but does anybody remember the Polish deli which was on or around Huxley Ave?
 

cheethamgirl

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Re: Cheetham/Hill 1950s/60s?
« Reply #24 on: 22:48:26, 30/01/11 »
Hi Citylad,


I don't recall a Polish Deli on Huxley Avenue (I was born on that avenue in 1953 and left in 1973. Leslie Cohen ran a grocers half way down the avenue, and old Mrs Kemp ran a sweet shop at the Cheetham Hill Rd end until it was taken over and became a Pakistani grocers.  However, around the corner from Huxley, on Heywood Street, there were several delis - Mr Boyco (Ukranian or Polish, I think) ran one (I think his predecessor was a Mr Radivan) and further down Heywood St was Mr Margolis' shop.


Mr Taskey ran a grocer's shop on Kelvin Grove, the next avenue down from Huxley. 


I really had to tweak my memory to drag all this  out!   ;D
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Steven

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Re: Cheetham/Hill 1950s/60s?
« Reply #25 on: 09:22:39, 01/02/11 »
I also enjoyed seeing the photos you posted. I remember the old Cheetham Baths. A little lower down from the baths was a short row of terraced houses overshadowed by tall trees. I would guess these houses dated from the early 1800s and I used to imagine they once housed hand-loom weavers. I found them on an 1850 map of Cheetham so they were at least this old. They seemed to be permanently in darkness due to the trees in the front garden. Today I suppose they would have been preserved but they must have been demolished at least 30 years ago. The other side of the baths was a green-painted shed with a serving hatch - this was the shop where we used to buy jellybabies - Lorenzis?
 
Further up Cheetham Hill was the Cheetham Library with its dark wooden interior and solemn atmosphere. At one side was a steep cobbled street named Paisely Terrace. I used to view this as a survival from early 1800s Manchester and feel the atmosphere of the area was destroyed when it was demolished. The other side of the library was a furniture shop - Hardys - a relation of mine worked here. I also remember the delicatessen on the other side of the road for its distinctive aroma - was it called Levys or Hyman's?
 
Another curious Cheetham memory that I have is sitting in a car in the early-mid 1960s on Esmond Road, near the Woodlands Road end. I recall seeing the lamplighter come and adjust one of the gas lamps in the street - did Cheetham really have gas lighting in the 1960s?
 
Anyone interested in Cheetham Hill in past years should read Mr. Swindell's history of Manchester. It was first published in the early 1900s but has been reprinted. It is fascinating reading about the thatched cottages that used to stand in Cheetham Village and the Tudor inn that occupied the site of the Temple Hotel until about 1850. Also it is fascinating to read of Bluebell valley at the end of Walnut Street where people used to stroll on summer evenings - this is a Cheetham far beyond living memory.

celeste

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cheethamgirl

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Re: Cheetham/Hill 1950s/60s?
« Reply #27 on: 10:38:55, 01/02/11 »
I think the shop next to the swimming baths was Lorenzini's Italian Coffee shop and ice cream parlour.  They were the first coffee shop in the area to have a Gaggia machine.  The noise ofit and the aroma used to entice folks in.  I loved the rare occasions we could afford to pop in, my Dad and me, so he could have an 'eyetalian' coffee and I would have a dish of water ice so cold it would make your head ache.  One of my school friends lived down St Marks Lane which ran around the back of the shops, off Cheetham Hill road, and we used to play in the graveyard opposite her house, as those tiny houses too were early 1800s and had no gardens.  St Marks Lane kids had a bonfire every Nov 5 and I recall one ear a lady's windows cracked with the heat.  Another friend lived at 29 Esmond Rd.  I do remember gas lights in some of the streets in the late fifties.  That Swindell's book looks interesting.  Might as well continue all the way down memory lane!
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Steven

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Re: Cheetham/Hill 1950s/60s?
« Reply #28 on: 11:17:39, 01/02/11 »
Yes. I think the book's author was Thomas Swindells. I have a five volume edition with old photos - though all of the centre of Manchester. I know this is off topic, but does anyone remember Marsden Square - one entrance of which was from the back door of C&A on Market Street? Swindells wrote the square dated from c1800 - the Arndale Centre is no replacement.
 
Back to Cheetham, I am told I was taken as a child to the Shakespeare Cinema on Halliwell Lane. Anyone remember this or have a photo?
 
Past Paisley Terrace, the next street up the hill, turn the corner and to the left was the entrance to what must have been a large stables. Besides the rag and bone man, I remember fruit and vegetables sold from a horse and cart by uncle Ike.
 
At the corner of Huxley Avenue and Cheetham Hill Road was a chemist shop with a colorful display of red or pink colored bottles in the small window. On the opposite side of the road was a fruit and vegetable shop whose owner was not so friendly.
 
Going up towards Bignor Street was a terrace of houses set back a little from the Cheetham Hill Road. One of these had a plaque saying that authoress Beecher Stowe stayed there in 1851.
 
Leslie Cohen's grocery shop on Huxely Avenue I can also remember. I used to go in there as a little kid with penny I had wrapped up in silver foil and think he would mistake it for a florin! He took it well. He lived in the bungalow opposite the shop. This looked so out of place in this terraced street. I was told it was built on the site of houses destroyed by bombs in WW2. I wonder if the bungalow is still there?
 
I also remember the terraced houses on Elizabeth Street with the matchbox size gardens in front. Opposite was the Jewish Hospital where I was taken after a stray firework set one of my socks on fire. It was a long narrow building. Next to it was a park with a bowling green. The post office at the corner of Elizabeth Street, and I think a branch of William Deacon's Bank, were the last survivorss of the old buildings here. Perhaps they lasted into the mid-70.

cheethamgirl

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Re: Cheetham/Hill 1950s/60s?
« Reply #29 on: 12:53:22, 01/02/11 »
Weren't there public loos in Paisley Terrace? 
 
As for Lesley Cohen the shopowner, I used to play out with their daughter Annette and bought 'Beech Nut' chewing gum from a machine outside. Mrs Cohen was kind and used to give me the odd ice lolly.  In those days, the Cohens lived in a flat over the shop and I remember them having the bungalow built.  It did look a little out of place in the middle of all those terraces, which were built in 1910 (according to an inscription we found when we stripped wallpaper off once.  They are still standing, by the way, although most of Heywood street was demolished in the late 60s.  If you have Google Earth you can see them.  They seem to have all been reroofed - perhaps taken on by a housing association?  I found some images of the interior of one of the houses in the block where I had lived.  It was on an estate agent's website.  It was very surprising to see such a familiar interior - with the walk-through dining room with it's window with roof light, as very little light came into those houses. The front lounge had a box in the corner, which houses the gas meter which was accessed from the hallway - 'anyone got a bob for the meter, the lights just went out'!!   ;D   
 
Our house had Jewish Mesuzzahs (tiny prayer scrolls in Hebrew script) attached to each interior doorframe, and we had a kitchen light bulb that never needed changing.  It was there when my folks bought the house in 1950 and still shining away when we moved out in 1973.  We once met the previous owner of the house and she said it had been there and never changed during the years she had occupied the house too.  'Don't make 'em like that any more!
 
In my time, the Chemist at the corner of Huxley Ave was Mr Malkin. Have you read any of Monty Dobkin's little booklets about Cheetham of yore?  I bought some from Central Library some years back.  In one of them, he lists all the shopkeepers on Cheetham Hill Road back in his day.
 
I am sad to see my old school, Notre Dame Convent, was demolished.  Although I lived a hop and skip away, I always seemed to be last one in through the door each morning.
 
I don't remember the Shakespeare cinema (there was a Shakespeare pub downtown in Fountain St Near Lewis's tho). I can only recall the Odeon down Cheetham Hill Rd, the Premier higher up and The Temple opposite Huxley Avenue.  The Odeon became a bowling alley and we used to go there for ice cold coke from their vending machines.  Sooo sophisticated.   I remember the Jewish hospital.  As a tomboy, I was always falling out of trees and suchlike and ending up in the casualty dept there.  I have millions of small black & white snaps of me as a baby & toddler in Elizabeth St park. Happy, uncomplicated days.
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