Author Topic: Market Street in the early sixties  (Read 23610 times)

celeste

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Re: Market Street in the early sixties
« Reply #45 on: 08:49:22, 19/05/12 »
Meng and Ecker was a very famous old cake shop and was mentioned in some of Howard Spring's Manchester-based books. Meng and Ecker eclairs...
Thanks for that Jill,
I walk past the shop (Opticians) regularly to get into St. Anne's Square - I really must look up some of Howard Spring's books, did he live near  I'm wondering Fallowfield because my mother ceertainly knew of him :-\
All that's necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing

SalfordLad

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Re: Market Street in the early sixties
« Reply #46 on: 10:10:00, 19/05/12 »
Anyone remember when Pauldens became Debenhams. And wasn't there another Pauldens store that burned down?
I think it was the same building - the shell was left for quite a while then maybe Debenhams swallowed up Pauldens for a song, refurbished & the rest is history.

plumber carl

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Re: Market Street in the early sixties
« Reply #47 on: 13:10:37, 04/06/12 »
Does anyone remember Ralphs Records at the corner of Corporation St & Fennel St which led to Victoria Station.
He used to stock lots of rare soul records & imports. It was the place most Manchester DJs used to go to in the late 60s & early 70s.
 
Ralph really knew his stuff.
Anyone know what happened to Ralph?
 

  just about remember that shop we used to buy from spin inn,, out side  tramps,,,  paper chase because they were cheep,,, hmv market st,,, and tony's records shudill  remember spin inn had all the imports in the window all priced up

lozflan

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Re: Market Street in the early sixties
« Reply #48 on: 20:45:48, 02/07/12 »
THOSE SHOPS WERE TREASURE TROVES FOR MY WIFE AND I. THE VEG BARROWS ON HIGHAND MARKET STS. IGOT MY BROTHEL CREEPERS FROM TIMPSONS. IREMEMBER  DUNNS  I THOUGHT IT WAS FOR COUNTRY GENTS BUT THEY SOLD  ANDY CAPPS LIKE MY DADS......                                                            WE NEVER GO DOWN THERE NOW I THINK ITS BOREING, AND THE TRASH IS UNBELIEVABLE/////             when i worked in old smithfield market, the mwss was comparable, but was never left dirty for long.
Politicians and nappies must be changed often,and for the same reason

lozflan

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Re: Market Street in the early sixties
« Reply #49 on: 21:06:37, 02/07/12 »
pre. 60s tib st. on saterday was the place to be, the strongman bending bars and nails , someone lying in chains on the floor.  stallholders  scamming the throng, while planted customers clamered to buy.    i myself was conned one xmas in lewisses of all places,on the top floor. i was just a kid, i saw this crowd around a man doing amazing things with a cut out of charlie chaplin.IHAD 5 BOB BURNING A HOLE IN MY POCKET, WHY NOT TREAT MYSELF FOR XMAS WITH A GREAT TOY? WHEN I GOT IT HOME IT WAS JUST A PIECE OF CARDBOARD WITH STRINGS, THAT THE MAN WAS EXPERT WITH.I THINK I THREW IT ON THE FIRE, TO SHUT MY DAD UP .
Politicians and nappies must be changed often,and for the same reason

julie

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Re: Market Street in the early sixties
« Reply #50 on: 08:58:59, 03/07/12 »
you had a whole shilling to spend how reckless but i an imagine the hurt and dissapointment cos a bob was a lot of money then. And money seemed to mean something it was heavy and substantial ::)
fate keeps on happening

SalfordLad

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Re: Market Street in the early sixties
« Reply #51 on: 10:57:38, 03/07/12 »
Lewis's had their toys on the top floor & Santa's grotto (only went once I think it was too expensive for my mum & dad) at Christmas.
There was often a chap doing a demo of some stuff you stuck on the end of a straw & you could blow on the straw & create orange translucent "balloons" - the demo used to fascinate me.
Later on in life my favourite place in Lewis's changed to the other end of the building & the record department in the basement & in those days 'cos there wasn't much on the radio for pop music fans (apart from Luxxie in the evenings if you could get a decent signal) you could go to the basement & listen to the records there - I remember buying a 78 of the Big Bopper's Chantilly Lace! Plus a few others of course.

lozflan

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Re: Market Street in the early sixties
« Reply #52 on: 12:30:43, 03/07/12 »
BLIMEY I WOULD,NT HAVE MINDED A SHILLING, IT WAS FIVE BOB. I USED TO SELL CHOPPED FIREWOOD,HUGE BAGS, AND LIGHT FIRES FOR JEWISH PEOPLE, AT WEEKENDS. I DID,NT UNDERSTAND THE WORD  SPENDS.  IT WAS ALL HARD EARNED.
Politicians and nappies must be changed often,and for the same reason

lozflan

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Re: Market Street in the early sixties
« Reply #53 on: 13:06:29, 03/07/12 »
MY DAD DROVE A FURNITURE VAN FOR ARDWICK HAULAGE. IT WAS HIRED OUT TO THE FURNITURE SHOP IN MARKET ST , THE NAME ESCAPES ME, ON LEWISS,ES SIDE,HALFWAY DOWN. VERY POSH.          LATER IT WAS HIRED OUT TO BR. RAIL. WE CALLED AT THE HUNDREDS OF SMALL MANUFACTURERS OF CLOTHING IN CENTRAL M/C. PICKING UP BOXES, TAKING THEM TO THE STATIONS. I GOT TO KNOW A LOT OF BACK ST,S.
Politicians and nappies must be changed often,and for the same reason

cheethamgirl

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Re: Market Street in the early sixties
« Reply #54 on: 07:59:25, 05/07/12 »
Just picked up on this thread after a while doing other stuff.  St Ann's square was lovely.  Haven't been there in donkeys' years.  Henry Barrie, our school outfitters was there. I recall my parents' delight at my passing my 11 plus was brought crashing down somewhat when they saw what Barries charged for the uniform.  No second hand school uniform shop in those days - it would have been considered infra dig.




Kardomah Coffee House - used to go to the one in Market Street once in a blue moon as a Saturday treat. I'd sit with my parents in one of those booths around the sides, with images of elephants etc on the wall panels.  The smell of fresh coffee roasting (they sold it ground to take away) was wonderful.  I used to have a child size pork pie with gravy contained within the  top crust  and beans and potato croquettes, followed by really good ice cream served in a little steel sundae dish.  I was also allowed lemon tea, aka Russian tea, served in a glass in a silver holder.  If my Dad was really flush, he'd buy a bag of ground Blue Mountain coffee (Jamaica blend) to take home. I thought it was all sooooo sophisticated!  Such happy memories. :smitten:
Author:  'Odd Man Out - A Motiveless Murder?' & 'The Cheetham Hill Murder'

lozflan

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Re: Market Street in the early sixties
« Reply #55 on: 10:15:44, 05/07/12 »
glad to see lots of you went in WYLES TOY SHOP AND CAME OUT WITH NOWT, NOT JUST ME. THE CARDBOARD CUT OUT OF CHAPLIN WAS THE ONLY NEW TOY I EVER HAD, AND THAT WENT ON THE FIRE IN DISGUST. ALTHOUGH MY GRANDAD DID MAKE ME A STEEL CANNON AT WORK.I USED TO VISIT S AND J WATTS[ BRITANIA HOTEL] LIKE STEPPING BACK IN TIME THE LIFT SHOULD HAVE BEEN PUT IN A MUSEUM.PARCELS WERE SENT DOWN A CURLING STEEL SHUTE FOR COLLECTION BY CUSTOMERS.
Politicians and nappies must be changed often,and for the same reason

julie

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Re: Market Street in the early sixties
« Reply #56 on: 18:18:43, 07/07/12 »
Howerd spring celeste niver heard of him but will look after all one is about to become a grandma and one must teach the child all about his Lancastrian heritage
fate keeps on happening

celeste

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Re: Market Street in the early sixties
« Reply #57 on: 20:34:40, 07/07/12 »
Howerd spring celeste niver heard of him but will look after all one is about to become a grandma and one must teach the child all about his Lancastrian heritage

O h definitely Julie, you never what what shenanigans may turn up :o ;)
Congrats. regarding your soon to be high status - let us know soonest O0 :)
All that's necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing

cheethamgirl

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Re: Market Street in the early sixties
« Reply #58 on: 07:57:41, 08/07/12 »
Speaking of Lancashire heritage etc., I was at Cliveden (the Bucks mansion where the Profumo/Christine Keller shennanigans occurred many years back) the other day having a nice salad in the orangery and watching all the beautiful children running around, when I heard a lady at a nearby table singing to her fractious grandchild.  She had a distinct Lancs accent and the little rhyme she was singing, complete with gestures, went: 'wind the bobbin up, wind the bobbin up, pull, pull, clap, clap, clap.'
It fascinated me because of course no-one in Lancs has wound a bobbin up in decades, and it occurred to me that this little song must have been handed down through several generations, sung by millworker parents, to their tots, whose only expectation in life was that they too might one day be winding a bobbin up.  It made me feel inexplicably sad.  However, the little chap to whom she was singing was cheered up no end, and he loved winding up his own invisible bobbin.  Unlike me, he was soon chuckling. ;D
Author:  'Odd Man Out - A Motiveless Murder?' & 'The Cheetham Hill Murder'

cheethamgirl

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Re: Market Street in the early sixties
« Reply #59 on: 07:58:49, 08/07/12 »
Meant to add that, though the mills have long gone, the song lingers on.  That's heritage for you. :)
Author:  'Odd Man Out - A Motiveless Murder?' & 'The Cheetham Hill Murder'