Author Topic: Tripe Colony  (Read 15341 times)

Manchester Man

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Tripe Colony
« on: 22:26:25, 07/12/12 »
Tripe Colony situated off Hulme Hall Lane had an area that had no houses built on it.

The area was from (I think) Corelli St between Falmouth Street and Clifton Street up to where Clifton Street curved round.
I think in later years there was a School for handicapped children built there.

Does anyone know why this area was left without houses?

ATB
Ray.
Never try to teach a pig to sing.
It wastes your time and annoys the pig.

arthurchappell

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Re: Tripe Colony
« Reply #1 on: 07:09:41, 08/12/12 »
my mum's parents used to live on Falmouth Street - i remember the huge open ground area there - lots of scrap yards nearby - close to the canal and what was then Mather & platts - now a soft drinks factory - there were lots of coal pits there up to the 1950's so it could be that the area was too at risk of subsidence to build on - it wasn't recreation ground - just a large dusty croft
Arthur Chappell, writer,  Civil War Re-enactor, ex-cult member, socialite  http://arthurchappell.me.uk/

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Manchester Man

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Re: Tripe Colony
« Reply #2 on: 10:02:23, 08/12/12 »
Thanks for that Arthur.

You could well be correct. Bradford Pit was not that far away and I know some of the houses suffered from subsidence caused by the pit. The Pit could well have been shut down due to creating subsidence as it was underneath an entire built up area.

Coal was stored/dumped in big heaps between Clifton St and the railway. I understand there were people who had some of it away for their fires  :o

I remember around 1/3 of the "Croft" being flattened and spread with black cinders to make a football area, or at least that's what it was used for. Black at least made a change from the "Red Rec". This would have been in the mid fifties.

ATB
Ray.
Never try to teach a pig to sing.
It wastes your time and annoys the pig.

Manchester Man

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Re: Tripe Colony
« Reply #3 on: 18:44:36, 08/12/12 »
Done a bit of digging around.

The school that was built on the black cinder playing area was Lea Croft Special School. It was certainly there in 1969. It's address was Corelli St.

ATB
Ray.
Never try to teach a pig to sing.
It wastes your time and annoys the pig.

Manx

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Re: Tripe Colony
« Reply #4 on: 12:47:31, 09/12/12 »
So where would the old tripe processing factory, which gave name to the colony, actually have been located - Lord Street next to the Rochdale canal - Clifton Street next to the railway - or was there ever a factory?  (assuming a boiler room plant of some kind would be needed to boil and process the offal into tripe, cow-heels, chitlins etc')

Manchester Man

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Re: Tripe Colony
« Reply #5 on: 13:23:48, 09/12/12 »
As far as I am aware there was never a Tripe Factory in the immediate area.

The houses were built By Pendlebury's who did have a Factory and I understand shops. The only reference I can find for Pendlebury's is a factory on Hyde Road, Ardwick.

Why the houses were built I don't know (perhaps as an investment).

ATB
Ray.
Never try to teach a pig to sing.
It wastes your time and annoys the pig.

Adsum

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Re: Tripe Colony
« Reply #6 on: 13:50:07, 09/12/12 »
When I was a child growing up in Droylsden I remember that there used to be a large UCP factory very close to the old Grey Mare Lane Market. Whether the workers were housed on "Tripe colony" or not I do not know. I also seem to remember local gossip was that the colony was demolished in order that they could build athlete accomodation for the commonwealth games. This accomodation was going to be used for local housing after the games finished
We are all lying in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

arthurchappell

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Re: Tripe Colony
« Reply #7 on: 13:59:11, 09/12/12 »
Tripe Colony was probably a general term of abuse for a working class housing estate - all terraced housing. The area suffered badly in the 80's and 90's as Mather & Platts closed and preperations for moving the City football ground to nearby Clayton developed. The pubs vanished too, including the Prince of Wales, known to many only as The Dead House (many never recognized the real name) as bodies had been given post mortems in there during the blitz. Sometimes the later landlords had coffins or coffin lids as tables outside in the Summer for drinkers to rest pints on
Arthur Chappell, writer,  Civil War Re-enactor, ex-cult member, socialite  http://arthurchappell.me.uk/

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Manchester Man

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Re: Tripe Colony
« Reply #8 on: 17:16:31, 09/12/12 »
Hi Arthur,
Thanks for the explanation regarding the "Dead House". I have had a few pints in there but never knew why it was nicknamed as such.

Tripe Colony was named after the people who built the houses (Pendlebury's Tripe). In it's day it was the latest housing to be built in the area. The other side of Hulme Hall Lane was already built up.

From what I have found there was a "Manchester Steel Works"(1870) at the Lord St side and at the Clifton St side there was a Brick Works (1900).

The demolition of Tripe Colony was first mooted for the Olympic Games bid. Had the Commonwealth Games not come along you have to wonder what would have become of the area.

ATB
Ray.
Never try to teach a pig to sing.
It wastes your time and annoys the pig.

Manx

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Re: Tripe Colony
« Reply #9 on: 11:00:58, 10/12/12 »
Isn't life strange? - from the info given in this thread and after some Googling i found this link which positively states that the UCP processing plant was located in Howarth Street, Bradford - on the very doorstep of where i was born.

http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/LANCSGEN/2000-03/0952289887

...and the U.C.P's own website

http://www.unitedcattleproducts.co.uk/index.php

If the tripe colony houses were originally intended for the benefit of JP. Pendlebury Ltd UCP workers, then i would assume some would have had to travel the mile up Mill Street or Forge Lane and across Ashton New Road to the factory, in which case "The Tripe Colony" is a very befitting description as the workers would have indeed, been somewhat 'colonised'


Manchester Man

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Re: Tripe Colony
« Reply #10 on: 15:52:48, 10/12/12 »
Hi Manx,

Glad you got your own bit of interest from the thread.

It seems that the Pendlebury Bothers built the houses as an investment. I have a vague recollection that they (or their Estate) were still drawing rent in the Sixties. I know odd houses were sold.

ATB
Ray.
Never try to teach a pig to sing.
It wastes your time and annoys the pig.

Manx

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Re: Tripe Colony
« Reply #11 on: 17:40:13, 10/12/12 »
Hi Manchester Man,
 
The picture has become clearer with each snippet of info' and is very interesting, my own guess or viewpoint without really knowing (but you may know more?) is that the tripe colony housing was originally "tied"

Tied housing, where the employer leases or rents their property to employees at a much reduced rent but with occupancy conditions eg:- if you are sacked you must also vacate the property etc' etc' - many larger companies had "tied-to-employment" housing. Many mill owners owned full streets of houses in years gone by, Lever Brothers (Sunlight Soap) in Port Sunlight owned a whole village that was tied. It promoted a loyalty and trustworthy 'worker-to-company' connection. In some situations tied houses could be untied into 'rent-to-buy'

Manchester Man

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Re: Tripe Colony
« Reply #12 on: 21:18:58, 10/12/12 »
Hi Manx,

The "Tied" housing may have been a possibility but there could only have been a few houses used that way. There must have been 300 or 400 houses on Tripe Colony which would have been far more than needed for the "Tripe" workers.

Another interesting fact has emerged in the there were some Prefabs at the junction of Hulme Hall Lane and Clifton St. These apparently were built where houses were demolished with a Land Mine.
Would have been a much bigger bang had it hit the Gas Works  :o

ATB
Ray.
Never try to teach a pig to sing.
It wastes your time and annoys the pig.

Manchester Man

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Re: Tripe Colony
« Reply #13 on: 17:33:29, 16/12/12 »
The "Bomb" Maps confirm the Land Mine I mentioned was in fact a High Explosive bomb.

The Land Mine dropped a little further down, just the other side of the Joynson Memorial. . There were Pre-fabs bult there also.

ATB
Ray.
Never try to teach a pig to sing.
It wastes your time and annoys the pig.

puggy

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Re: Tripe Colony/Hanbury Street
« Reply #14 on: 09:11:06, 17/02/14 »
Only recently joined this forum so just read 'Tripe Colony' which last saw any activity December 2012.

My family history research brought me to Hanbury Street, where several of my
ancestors lived. I say ancestors, when in fact my Grandparents family including my Dad lived there. c1911 to early 1930s.

On Google Earth you can still make out the layout of the roads, and the Manchester Images site has lots of pics of various streets....by 'eck it looks grim, but was really good housing and a big improvement in housing at the time.