Author Topic: Tripe Colony  (Read 15342 times)

Joynson

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Re: Tripe Colony
« Reply #15 on: 20:45:45, 08/05/14 »
 Tripe Colony was where I lived for nine years.
 It started at Hulme Hall Lane and went to Corelli St. Bounded by Lord St. ( later Lord North St. ) and Clifton St.
 The houses were built by the Pendlbury family whose nearest shop at the time I lived there was on Ashton New Rd,.
 There was a tripe dressing factory on nearby  Grimshaw Lane but whether it was Pendlbury`s or not I don`t know.
  The houses were not tied as my grandparents lived on the colony in the late 1920`s- early 1930`s and did not work for Pendlebury`s.
 It was always considered a nice place to live, the houses being of stock brick always looked clean and everyone did their front steps each morning. Likewise heaven help you if your back step and your part of the back entry alongside your back yard was not clean and tidy .Steps once weekly. My O.H. got told off because my back steps were not done-----the reason being I`d just had a baby at home.
 Ladies wore  mob caps to clean in, no headscarves in those days. Nor curlers!                In the days before wrapped sliced bread a clean tea cloth was taken to Pearson`s the bakers on Hulme Hall Lane to wrap loaves in.
 You could join the Chistmas clubs at Beecrofts the pottery and  hardware shop, Beecrofts drapers, Mannings and Whittingham`s butchers,the grocer`s on the corner of Falmouth st and Hulme Hall lane. Allen`s the chip shop which was so clean and such lovely silver hake , on Falmouth st corner . Halliwell`s sweet shop  where you coud borrow their wooden bench if you were having a kiddie`s birthday party, Northrop`s  the chemist, Ginny Ringlands greengrocery,
 Howards P.O and herbalist, the newsagent,hairdressers, Hartley`s the barbers,Hanson`s monumental masons. Pelham`s the shoemenders ,Seymore Mead grocer and the little sweet shop on the corner of Holland St recreation ground. Hetty`s fancy goods on Falmouth St and  Simkiss`s the outdoor licence on Falmouth st.  It was a pretty self sufficient area  and houses were snapped up. Either to rent or to buy as gradually they mostly became.
  I have very happy memories of tripe colony and was very sad to see its decline which gradually came about in the years after we left .
 Hope I`ve jogged some happy memories for others. `bye for now. Joynson.
 

Hideaway69

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Re: Tripe Colony
« Reply #16 on: 23:23:48, 08/05/14 »
Welcome to the forum Joynson, you paint an evocative picture of life in the Tripe Colony.  O0
I Started Out with Nothing and I Still Got Most of It Left

Manchester Man

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Re: Tripe Colony
« Reply #17 on: 09:17:38, 09/05/14 »
Hi Joynson,
Thanks for the post. Brought back quite a few names I had forgotten.
You forgot a few of the streets though. From Hulme Hall Lane you had Joynson St (guess that's where your name is from),Handbury St, Wimbourne St, Corelli St, Helston St, Wedgewood St and lastly Pendlebury St.
There were two small streets running in line with Lord St called Dreyfus St and Kersley St.
 
I lived in Tripe Colony until 1966 but had forgotten most of the shop/shop keepers names. Any more memories then post them up. There's a lot of the history of the "older" area's of Manchester gets lost because memories are "local" and never get recorded.
 
ATB
Ray.
Never try to teach a pig to sing.
It wastes your time and annoys the pig.

Joynson

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Re: Tripe Colony
« Reply #18 on: 19:42:54, 09/05/14 »
 Hello, Sorry  I just outlined the boundary streets, not the ones running between.
 The School on the croft  near the top of Clifton St. round the corner was for children with special educational needs. It was called Leacroft I seem to remember.
The houses did suffer from the subsidence  of the Roger coal seam which ran below the colony.One week the house doors would close ---- the next they would not!
 We were in "The Catahrral zone," so called by M/C University who were doing a survey of how the air quality, mainly the acidic fumes from Hardman and Holden`s , affected the linings of our noses! ( and the subsequent  runny noses-----ugh).
 We played as children on nearby Holland St recreation ground where many huge slabs of beautifully carved masonry were stored from the bombed buildings  in central M/C of the Christmas 1940 blitz.They were like ready made castles to us.
 A fair used to visit and  pitch on the red rec.                                                             It must have been hard to play football on that shale especially as the rain made lots of quite deep gullies .
Mr, Kendal--Pop Kendal-- headteacher at Holland St School..Miss Howarth, Miss Sidebottom,Miss Shepherd( later Mrs. Hopkirk I think,) Mr. Timms, and lots of lovely students teachers who did a crash course when demobbed  but were very good.
 Always in trouble for running up the coke pile round the back near the toilets, from Mr. Whitehouse the caretaker. The open fires in the classroms, frozen milk put to thaw,saving the cardboard discs from the bottles  to make pom-poms with wool.
 The folk dancing and folk singing, I loved it all.We got a good education, and discipline. Even when pop Kendal`s strap was hidden up the chimney!!!!!  I`ll stop now , bye for now. Joynson.

Adsum

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Re: Tripe Colony
« Reply #19 on: 20:24:17, 09/05/14 »

You may or may not of seen these clips before, but worth another look to old residents of the Colony.




http://flickeflu.com/set/72157628388257487

http://www.archivesplus.org/history/triple-colony/


We are all lying in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

Manchester Man

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Re: Tripe Colony
« Reply #20 on: 20:48:59, 09/05/14 »
Hi Adsum,
Thanks for the links.
In the first link there is a letter from "Anthony" to his mother. The school was St Lukes. I'm fairly sure it was my uncle who wrote the letter. He was born in 1901 and the letter mentions "standard 6" going into 7. I don't know what ages that refers to but he would have been around 13 at that time.
He (at the time) lived opposite St Lukes church on Albion St in the Butchers shop (Franklands Butchers).
 
Incidentally he lived at 4 Joynson St before moving to Failsworth.
 
Anyone with info on what Standard 6 or 7 ages would be ?
 
ATB
Ray.
Never try to teach a pig to sing.
It wastes your time and annoys the pig.

melliott

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Re: Tripe Colony
« Reply #21 on: 19:43:38, 05/07/14 »
The houses on the tripe colony were built by the owners of the tripe dressing factory for their employees. They were tied houses.
When the factory closed all the houses were bought by the Pendlebury family. In order to get a house on the colony you had to provide two references.
I lived on Hanbury Street from 1962 until I married in 1986. My mother Iris Arthington was born in the house in 1926 and lived there until the houses were compulsory purchased in the early 90's during Manchesters bid for the 2000 Olympics.

Joynson

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Re: Tripe Colony
« Reply #22 on: 22:28:26, 14/07/14 »
 Do you know when the houses were bought by the Pendlburys? They had tripe shops.     As early as 1920`s -30`s they were not tied houses  because as I said, my grandparents lived in Joynson St.  and no one in the family either worked for the Pendleburys or at  the tripe works. It was rented .So  they must have been been bought  by the Pendleburys before then to be rented out and  not necessarily to employees.
 We bought ours in 1956, from people who had bought it from the Pendleburys, however most were still rented. We had the stop tap in our living room ( yes living room)for the whole row, very inconvenient- it ought to have been moved when the house was sold as every other on the row was still rented.                                                                   We left in 1965, again a private sale.
 Joynson

daisynook

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Re: Tripe Colony
« Reply #23 on: 15:01:51, 23/07/14 »
Just came across this forum and want to thank all contributors for some of the information I have picked up.  I have tried to get information about Tripe Colony in the past, to no avail!
My grandparents lived in Helston Street from the 1900s until they were compulsory purchased around 1990s when they were compulsory purchased.  My Dad and his 6 siblings were all born there and my Dad's sister was still there at the end when she was the only person living in the street with all the other houses empty and boarded up.  She was burgled twice and had people on the roof stealing lead and anything they could lay their hands on.
My Grandmother used to talk about what a nice place to live it was when she was newly married.  I spent a lot of time at my Grandparents house when I was growing up and remember the days when everyone had their front door permanently open and often sat in the 'vestibule' to have a chat to passers by.  The only draw back was the chemical factory at the end of the street where if the wind was in the wrong direction you had a bad eggs smell!
My father and siblings went to Corpus Christie school in Miles Platting and I have a school photograph of my Dad in a 1920s class that I could post.
Thanks again everyone

daisynook

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Re: Tripe Colony
« Reply #24 on: 15:06:32, 23/07/14 »
An addition to last post.  The last I heard Corpus Christie church is now a Mosque!!

Manchester Man

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Re: Tripe Colony
« Reply #25 on: 15:42:26, 23/07/14 »
An addition to last post.  The last I heard Corpus Christie church is now a Mosque!!

Hi daisynook,
 
I'm fairly sure that the Corpus Christi Basilica is now known as the Usmania Banqueting Halls and caters for Asian Weddings. This of course could have changed.
 
ATB
Ray.
Never try to teach a pig to sing.
It wastes your time and annoys the pig.

stewart5158

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Re: Tripe Colony
« Reply #26 on: 22:38:27, 01/08/15 »
My name is Stewart Campbell, I was born at 44 Corelli Street in 1967 and lived there for many happy years until the compulsory purchase order in the 1990s. I have very fond memories of playing in the grounds of Leacroft School,which was directly opposite our house. I attended St Luke's Primary School on Hulme Hall Lane. I remember the shops on Hulme Hall Lane too, Malcolm's butchers, Chemist shop, hardware shop and barber's. There was also the cake shop. We used to play in Phillips park and on Mather and Platt's football and cricket pitches. It was a wonderful place to grow up. :)

Manchester Man

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Re: Tripe Colony
« Reply #27 on: 10:19:46, 02/08/15 »
Hi Stewart,
Where Leacroft School was used to be an open space or "croft" as we called it. One day the top was scrapped off and tons of black cinders were dumped and spread out.

We used it for playing football although it tended to cost you quite a bit in lost skin  ;D.

In later years Leacroft was built on the site.

I seem to remember your houses had "Set back" doors inside an "interior" sort of porch.

ATB
Ray.
Never try to teach a pig to sing.
It wastes your time and annoys the pig.

Frank W

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Re: Tripe Colony houses
« Reply #28 on: 15:32:05, 20/02/17 »
Can anyone give me an estimate of the number of houses on Tripe Colony in the 40s/50s? Thanks.

Manx

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Re: Tripe Colony
« Reply #29 on: 17:33:40, 24/02/17 »
Total number of 'Tripe Colony' houses (1945)

Hulme Hall Lane         =  45
Joynson Street           = 93
Hanbury Street           = 75
Wimbourne Street      = 62
Corelli Street              = 47
Helston Street            = 31
wedgewood Street     = 25
Pendlebury Street       = 20
Lord Street                  = 8
Falmouth Street          = 42
Clifton Street               = 28
......................................
Total Houses               = 476