Author Topic: Irish History Series  (Read 2787 times)

IWHC

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Irish History Series
« on: 10:12:47, 08/05/13 »
7.30 pm
Cost £3
On Tuesday 7th June 1921, three men were executed at Dublin’s Mountjoy Gaol. Executions of Republicans were coming thick and fast during Cogadh na Saoirse; The Irish War of Independence.
Two of the men hanged on 7 June were also Republicans. That day however, the third man taking the short walk through the red door of the hang house and into eternity was not a Republican. Thirty-three year old William Mitchell was a temporary constable in the Royal Irish Constabulary – a ‘Black and Tan’.
Despite the atrocities committed by both sides during the bitter struggle for Ireland’s independence, Dubliner Mitchell was the only member of the British Crown Forces to be hanged for murder during the conflict. Convicted of killing a local magistrate in the quiet Wicklow town of Dunlavin, Mitchell faced the hangman’s noose, still protesting his innocence.
The question is, however, did he do it, or was this a politically expedient miscarriage of justice?  Manchester-born Irish author DJ Kelly talks of the two years of research which led to her uncovering the forgotten story of this tragic man, tracking down his living family members and writing his hitherto untold story as a fact-based novel.

cheethamgirl

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Re: Irish History Series
« Reply #1 on: 12:32:06, 17/05/13 »
This talk is by me, Cheethamgirl, one of your regular posters here on the Manchester forum,(I'm also known as author DJ Kelly, as many of your already know).  http://http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/844/frontcoverrunningwithcr.jpg/
 
I am so looking forward to being back in my old neighbourhood, where I spent the first two decades of my life.  Also delighted to be seeing the splendid Irish World Heritage Centre for the first time.  My parents would have loved the place.  Looking forward to seeing any of my Manc forum chums who might be able to come along on the evening - 12 June at 7.30 pm to say hello. 
 
June 2013 sees the 92nd anniversary of the execution of temporary Constable William Mitchell, a Black & Tan and the only member of the British Crown Forces to be hanged for murder during the Irish War of Independence. 
 
« Last Edit: 12:35:33, 17/05/13 by cheethamgirl »
Author:  'Odd Man Out - A Motiveless Murder?' & 'The Cheetham Hill Murder'

celeste

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Re: Irish History Series
« Reply #2 on: 17:04:38, 17/05/13 »
I'm just happy to see you and Arthur posting again, I hate losing forum people, however it's nice to welcome John Carrington and Moorsy ex Belfast and now Canada
 
I hope to see you in Manchester, I may be there but I havn't decided whether or not to remain 'a mystery' as Mr Carrington put it ;)
All that's necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing

cheethamgirl

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Re: Irish History Series
« Reply #3 on: 08:18:53, 18/05/13 »
Hi Celeste,


Sorry to keep buzzing in and out.  I've been running around like a headless chicken, promoting my book and so on, but I do love popping in to read the new posts, even if I don't have a great deal of time to post on here myself.


It's nice to catch up on everyone's news and recollections.  I love the fact that there is now a BBC News Manchester feature alongside here too.


If you do come to my talk Celeste, do step up and say hello.  It would be so nice to meet you. 


I hope to speak about the amazing way the story of Mitchell came to light and the tricky journey I and some helpful cousins had in tracking down the true facts of this forgotten (perhaps deliberately so) case.
Author:  'Odd Man Out - A Motiveless Murder?' & 'The Cheetham Hill Murder'

celeste

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Re: Irish History Series
« Reply #4 on: 08:29:34, 18/05/13 »
 O0 O0 
As always good to see you on here
 
 
All that's necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing


cheethamgirl

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Re: Irish History Series
« Reply #6 on: 05:57:46, 14/06/13 »
It was a lovely turnout at the IWHC on Weds evening.  What a great centre it is, and what  lovely people I met there. So many who came to the talk had their own ancestor stories connected with the 'Tan times'.  I wish I'd brought a Dictaphone to record them all. 
In between my rare visits to Manchester, I always forget how lovely and friendly Mancunians are, so it's always refreshing to be reminded.  This trip was no exception, from the Cheetham based Pakistani taxi driver, who said if I needed a lift to town after the event, I should call at his Kelvin Grove home and his wife would drive me into town for free (!), to the ladies who do such a thorough job of cleaning the rooms at the Mitre Hotel and who knocked on to ask if I needed anything else to make my stay more comfortable, and of course the lovely people I met at IWHC.  Patrick and I were able to swap memories of Pakistan, as we have both spent time there. 
 
A big thanks to Rose and Margot for making all the arrangements.  Even bigger thanks to Rose and hubby John for taking me on a little trip down memory lane before dropping me back in the city. I can't believe John knew so many of my family members, and even remembers me from way back when. Rose updated me on news of my former teachers from Notre Dame too.  My old house is still there in Huxley Avenue, though the little industrial unit nearby which used to produce shrouds is now a Sikh Temple, and Notre Dame is long gone, of course.  I had a great old tramp around the city centre during my visit too, but oh my, what have they done to Piccadilly Gardens?  What a mess it all is.  As they say, nostalgia ain't what it used to be.
Author:  'Odd Man Out - A Motiveless Murder?' & 'The Cheetham Hill Murder'

celeste

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Re: Irish History Series
« Reply #7 on: 07:19:26, 14/06/13 »
Glad the evening went well for you, I did have to stay in due to family commitments, my son who works in Bury doesn't get home till after 7pm and I have to wait for him to look after my other son.
 
Will there be any photos of you in the local rags or M.E.N., I hope so :)
 
I wish I could have hidden Piccadilly Gardens from you, it is a mess, in fact with the bad weather (excepting last week's sunshine) it seems to look like winter all the time.  It won't look like summer until there are some huge flower displays.
 
Good to know your old house is still there though, did you take photos?
 
 
All that's necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing

cheethamgirl

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Re: Irish History Series
« Reply #8 on: 14:48:49, 14/06/13 »
Hi Celeste,


I didn't take any photos as it was getting dark then and we just make a 'drive past'.  Also I'd seen it recently on Google Earth.  I also prefer to remember it as it was in my time there.  All the neighbours I knew are gone now.  Maybe we'll get a chance to meet on my next trip.  Meantime, best wishes to you Celeste.   :)
Author:  'Odd Man Out - A Motiveless Murder?' & 'The Cheetham Hill Murder'

celeste

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Re: Irish History Series
« Reply #9 on: 16:22:17, 14/06/13 »
I look forward to that, I'd love to meet you O0
All that's necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing

Adsum

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Re: Irish History Series
« Reply #10 on: 10:59:08, 15/06/13 »
The link below is quite interesting. It concerns "The Manchester Martyrs"
 
 On Hyde Road West Gorton, opposite Bennett St, if you look closely one can still see the bullet scars in the old bridge from the incident. I have photographs on here somewhere of the marks. If I can find them I shall post one. The Memorial in St. Josephs Catholic cemetery Moston is a beautiful and strangely moving monument to the incident. sadly it was defaced and damaged some years ago at the height of the Manchester IRA bombings.
 
 
 
 
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manchester_Martyrs
We are all lying in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.