Author Topic: Manchester Central Grammar School for Boys  (Read 42734 times)

derekphil

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Re: Manchester Central Grammar School for Boys
« Reply #30 on: 10:21:00, 23/01/15 »
BarryJ,
I was there when the book was given out, but have no memory of it at all. I do remember Fud Lever, though, who taught me history, and put me off the subject. At least until much later, when I found it could be quite an interesting subject.
I've had a go at de-noising the pic, and I'm not sure it's worked, but will post it anyway.
If you would be prepared to send me a higher res image to my email address, I'll send my address.


BarryJ

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Re: Manchester Central Grammar School for Boys
« Reply #31 on: 16:09:49, 23/01/15 »
Derekphil,

Yes, Wilkinson put me off Latin, just as Fud Lever put you off history. Fortunately, my family moved to France in '52. I had a first class Latin teacher at the local lycée and really began to enjoy the subject. I returned to Central Grammar in September '54 where I spent a final year in 5 Arts with Soulby, and sat the GCE exams before going back to France.

If you send me your email address, I'll be happy to send you a higher res image of the staff. My scanner isn't very good, but the image will certainly be better than the one I posted.

As promised, I'm attaching a photo of Lever, Trueblood and Pollard.

derekphil

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Re: Manchester Central Grammar School for Boys
« Reply #32 on: 16:35:26, 23/01/15 »
BarryJ
I've sent my email address via the messaging system--click on "my messages" at the top of the page, and you should have it. If not, let me know.

rgds
derek

Fletch

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Re: Manchester Central Grammar School for Boys
« Reply #33 on: 23:07:59, 01/02/15 »
Hi Guys
Like others I have just discovered this Forum. My wife was sent a link for the Girls School by a nephew. She went there in the mid to late 60’s.

I am from the same intake as Alan (soulman1949) I think? Also born in 1949 and went to CGS from 1960 to 1965, leaving after my “O” Levels to get a job to have money in my pocket like my mates around home who had all left secondary or technical schools to go straight into jobs or apprenticeships. So didn't go into the 6th form and yes, we were very lucky then compared to today.

Much of what has been written is quite nostalgic and brings back many memories. Whilst I generally enjoyed my school years and have fond memories I was not as academic as soulman1989 so wasn’t put in the “x” (express stream).  I was in 1R the first year at Whitworth St then Kirky Lane thereafter. Funny thing about 1R that year (1960) – our Form Master was Mr ECKERSLEY (Boris) and we should have been in 1E (beginning with the letter “E”) whereas 1R should probably have been Mr RYDER? However, due to some administrative [censored] up we were stuck with 1R and Mr Eckersley, whom I recall was also the Scout Master of the School Scout Troop.

However, I did show a penchant for languages, so had the choice of a second language to take along with the compulsory French. I was in the “L1” stream (2L1, 3L1, 4L1 and 5L1) as opposed to the “L2” stream who did compulsory German as the second language. My second language choice was Latin we could have chosen German or Russian, but my folks weren’t keen on me taking German so soon after the war  (relatively speaking) and Russian just seemed too foreign in those days. So Latin it was, and we had Piggy STEWART who was great in Latin and lost that fierce reputation with us few lads in the class (just 7 or 8 of us I think). After he retired, we had a really tall guy, ex-army boxer 6’4” and pretty well built – can’t remember his name – but used to thump the blackboard when he got annoyed with us! He also took us on trips to York and Chester to look at Roman remains etc. – an interest that has stayed with me throughout my life and was particularly valid when visiting the ruins at Pompeii some years ago.

We also had John HOPLEY for Maths – he used the slipper a lot, and also had a “spanking” paddle that he got one Christmas, he used that quite a lot too! During classroom tests he often wandered up and down running his paddle along the radiators whilst singing or humming his favourite hymn “Guide Me O Thou Great Redeemer”!

Mr THOMAS for English, who ran the school rambling club, which I joined and we had many happy Saturdays in the Peak District climbing Kinder Scout and the like. I’m sure he lived in the High Peak area with another English teacher not sure of his name though. Looking back now I do wonder if they were Gay, something not discussed much at that time. That said there was never anything untoward that I was aware of, and if they were good luck to them.

After my first experience of Speech Day at the Free Trade Hall I was so impressed by the sound of the Recorders that I joined the group immediately and stayed until the end of the 4th year. I recall travelling around for competitions and the like, in particular going to the Winter Gardens in Blackpool. Thanks for reminding me of the teachers name Charles HALE.

I remember many of the other names mentioned too, Mr LAWS (French), Mr ROURKE (singing) – he told me that I was tone deaf and classed me as a “non singer”. Mr MILLINGTON (General Science – early years and much” Brylcreemed” hair?), Mr STELFOX (Physics in later years) – I found him wooden and he failed to hold my attention thus I lost any interest in the subject. Of course it could just have been me! Mr ROGERSON (Chemistry) far more interesting due to the experiments and ex RAF guy Mr POTTER for PE. I believe Mr Rogerson was also the Officer in Charge of the school Air Cadet Corps, and of course Dr de la PERELLE and Mr BOWCOTT. I do have a little anecdote about de la Perelle from many years after he retired but I’ll leave that for another time.

As has been said it was a great time to be at the school and I agree that we were lucky as I also got the chance to have a good education living in a council house on the edge of Moss Side during my school years and feel it stood me in good stead for the rest of my working life as well as life in general. I now live on the south coast in West Sussex where I’ve lived for some 27 years now. I still travel up to Manchester occasionally as we have family still in the area, but I do find myself wondering where I am at times when driving around, until I see an old landmark still standing!!

Thanks for the memories guys. I have never seen or heard from any of the boys from my year or form since I left school in 1965, so it would be good to hear from someone who was in the same stream as me, although Alan, I suspect we must have known or been aware of each other -  vaguely at least?

Apologies if I’ve waffled on a bit – it is a bit of a fault of mine, I’m afraid.  :)

Mark McElroy

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Re: Manchester Central Grammar School for Boys
« Reply #34 on: 18:14:34, 07/02/15 »
Yes, I too have only just seen this forum..
I was at the school from 1948 - 1953. Studied Chemistry, Physics and Biology in the sixth form before University for a degree in Chemistry. I well remember some of the staff mentioned in earlier contributions. I was taught most of my chemistry by A.W Smith. and all my biology (at the school) by a new member of staff at the time - Bill Speakman.
Bowcott was still deputy head when I left and Dr. de la Perrelle was still at the helm.
In the first five years I well remember Winterbottom and Wilkinson (both French) and Wyeth who was my form master in the first year. Judson, and `Bull` Ketley,I think, taught maths and Gus Harwood English. I remember `Fud` Lever who was the school librarian and a dedicated football fan - but whether he supported the reds or blues I do not recall. Joss Horrocks was our form master in the sixth. The physics master was `Trog` - surname now lost to me I`m afraid.
Some of my contemporaries: Keith Loach, John Higson,Ralph Skelt, Sid Stern, Harry Aggar. Where are they now, I wonder?
I still have a photo of the 1951-53 Sixth form somewhere but would find it difficult to get onto the Forum.

Edtheball

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Re: Manchester Central Grammar School for Boys
« Reply #35 on: 17:20:06, 23/02/15 »
Hi Guys
However, I did show a penchant for languages, so had the choice of a second language to take along with the compulsory French. I was in the “L1” stream (2L1, 3L1, 4L1 and 5L1) as opposed to the “L2” stream who did compulsory German as the second language. My second language choice was Latin we could have chosen German or Russian, but my folks weren’t keen on me taking German so soon after the war  (relatively speaking) and Russian just seemed too foreign in those days. So Latin it was, and we had Piggy STEWART who was great in Latin and lost that fierce reputation with us few lads in the class (just 7 or 8 of us I think). After he retired, we had a really tall guy, ex-army boxer 6’4” and pretty well built – can’t remember his name – but used to thump the blackboard when he got annoyed with us! He also took us on trips to York and Chester to look at Roman remains etc. – an interest that has stayed with me throughout my life and was particularly valid when visiting the ruins at Pompeii some years ago.


Hi all, PMFJI but...


Fletch, your boxer would no doubt have been Jack Firth, an extremely large man, of whom we heard all sorts of tales about him having been a Royal Marine Commando in WWII. Was it true... who knows - but he was a hell of a big chap.


I gave him a lift from Withington up to the A6 in Stockport around 15 years ago and, even up to circa 10 years' ago, I would occasionally see him in Didsbury, where I live and where he has/had an allotment. I have not seen him for time so perhaps he's no longer with us.


I'm a relative youngster compared to you gentlemen, having washed up to Kirkmanshulme Lane in 1965, leaving in 1970.


I was a duffer, so sixth form was never going to be an option. But, my father was a newspaperman and I was offered an apprenticeship in the industry - which I leapt at.


I spent a number of years on the 'nationals' and, while I'm no longer a journo, per se, I still earn a living writing PR and marketing tosh.


FTR: I remember Mr Hopley - well my regularly caned backside did (he was never malicious, though); 'Nosser' Bland; Bill Laws - whom I hated with a passion - 'Kipper' Wilkinson, known as such because of the slicked-ddown hair and central(sic) parting, and, of course, the great Dr de la Perelle, a true gentleman who never, ever 'lost it' with us spotty youths, whatever misdemeanour we had committed - and there were a few...  ;-)


I'll wrap up now and await the postings - or not - of some of the miscreants from my time at 'Central', who perhaps enjoyed the place more than i ever did. But maybe that was just me - and I am enjoying all of your memories.


Non nobis Domine...    ;-)

Mark McElroy

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Re: Manchester Central Grammar School for Boys
« Reply #36 on: 12:55:36, 13/03/15 »
Reading more of others`memories has also jogged mine a bit more. Wasn`t `Froggie`Wilkinson, who seems to have gained a different nickname of `kipper` later, a French teacher? Curious if he also taught maths.
I can agree with some of the comments about staff and their foibles. Piggy Stewart was pretty awful towards me when I began Latin a year later than others; interesting to know that several of you thought he was a decent man.I dropped the subject pretty quickly after his bullying and did not continue with Latin.Maybe I would have come to like him if I had been prepared to persist.
Interesting to read a comment about AW Smith and his smoking. I got my interest in chemistry from his classes in the lower school.However, his teaching in the sixth form was well below standard as I found out in my first year at Liverpool studying chemistry.

Mohammed Amin

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Re: Manchester Central Grammar School for Boys
« Reply #37 on: 14:35:58, 01/11/15 »
I have only just learned about the existence of this thread, and indeed the entire Manchester Forum website.

I was at the school from 1962-1969, and was part of the last cohort to spend time at Whitworth Street. We spent the first two terms of the first form at Whitworth Street, and then moved to Kirkmanshulme Lane. Sadly conversion to a comprehensive completely changed the character of the school, and then the reorganisations of the 1970's led to its closure. However I have very happy memories of it, and attending the school transformed my life chances.

If anyone remembers me and is interested in what I did after school, please visit the "About me" page of my website. I am not allowed to post a link, but if you Google my name "Mohammed Amin" you will find my website immediately. It is MohammedAmin DOT com


Brian Ferguson

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Re: Manchester Central Grammar School for Boys
« Reply #38 on: 22:25:00, 06/11/15 »
Just been looking at this...interesting.
Piggy Stewart was succeeded by James (Froggy) Wilkinson for latin...he got the nickname as someone saw him at the seaside in his rubber swimming kit and thought he looked like a frog. The giant mentioned was Jim Firth...he also taught elementary Greek and had a go at starting a school boxing club. I saw him on a pushbike in Didsbury in 2014...the bike was creaking...he hadn't lost weight.


Cross Country was run by Eli Basketter....and the Sports Master (Waletrs...typical welshman) used to inspect boots before you were allowed on the coach to Parrs Wood....he also used to have a separate line of boys whom he described as the Halt, the lame and the Lazy.


I'll chuck some more stuff in later...my memory hasn't gone yet!


I left in 1965 and was one of the first students when the school opened on Kirkmanshulme lane.


For me by far the most obnoxious teacher was Rourke, the music teacher....he would have been prosecuted under current laws. Caldbeck was not quite as nasty but was meticulous in attention to shoe polish and hair parting. I recall a boy once (who despised Caldbeck) ordered a load of rubble to be dropped at the entry to the staff car park. Caldbeck fancied himself as a boy racer so was gutted when he had to leave his car there.




Brian Ferguson

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Re: Manchester Central Grammar School for Boys
« Reply #39 on: 22:42:19, 06/11/15 »
I should add that Kipper was the nickname of Soulby, not Wilkinson. Soulby taught English...I use the word teach loosely....his idea of teaching us vanity Fair by Thackeray was basically reading it to us for the full lesson.


So what about the sadists?? Well who remembers Dobbin the Physivs teacher....the slipper for anyone who got less than 70% in the weekly test.


One of the finest teachers was the stuttering Mr Salmon who got ribbed a bit at first but who, in his English lessons, won us over with his thorough preparation....someone should have introduced him to Soulby.


Memories? Who went on the trip to the Isle of Skye?? We had a new teacher fresh out of the forces...he took us to Glen Brittle on Skye and we scaled some scary heights. In the days long before health and safety. He was inspirational. Oh yes his name...Brian (?) Horne.

Holmes

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Re: Manchester Central Grammar School for Boys
« Reply #40 on: 15:39:45, 10/11/15 »
I visited the site of the Kirkhanshulme Lane School on 5th November 2015.
Sad to say but it's a building site now, and looks as though the whole of the old site is being built on.
The only remaining part I recognised was the two gymnasium buildings that stood between the main building and the playing fields.
Others may remember the beautifully manicured grounds incorporating football and rugby pitches??
They are now under the soon-to-be-completed Belle Vue Speedway Stadium, which already has two large grandstands erected and the foundations laid for the cinder track.
It's sadder for me to see the destruction of those playing fields than the demise of the main building, but that's progress, as inevitable as it might be.
I have lost count of the games I played on the rugby pitches under the direction of the great Aiden Walters, a Welsh International, and the days spent in the summer running around the track as part of the school's 4x110 yards relay team.
I remembered three of that team had passed away in the last three years, Alan Keith Bott, Dave Fosatti and Alan Walker, all gone at an obscenely early age.
No doubt the new buildings being constructed will enhance the site and the area, but I miss the old playing fields.
John Holmes (1959-1964).



Terry Lowe

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Re: Manchester Central Grammar School for Boys
« Reply #41 on: 20:34:58, 27/12/15 »
This is my third attempt to achieve a post. I started in 1946at MCHS catching a workers bus from Wythenshawe at 8am didn't always make it in time.  I had tried Friends Utd years ago and after replying to a couple of plaintive replies got no response from either classmate.  Got to taking to two older years and got a lot of internet together until I mentioned I was a Christian. Went to a 1947 reunion and only found Ernie Rose who I remembered from cadets once he was identified. Was willing to travel from Kent to Manchester, Albert Sq to join in but wives were banned sadly. Am very busy still reaching 80 this year but travelling as a Christian to different countries. Never unemployed. No pay.  Only through remembering the Lord's Prayer we said at assembly with Fred Chaney did I become a Christian. And for the first time in my life at 49 when My life was in a mess did I lear that God was real.  I had a trial for Liverpool in 1953 at OL, joined the army, married was divorced, married again and played forty seriously until I was 63.  Had a brother in law in the lower year at MCHS not that he was then and another at K that you talk about. Was always nearly at the bottom of the class and only got a couple of subjects Art and Geography. Did get an BSc hons Eng later in the army, then became a Snr lecturer in all sorts taking vol redundancy in 1989.

Terry Lowe

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Re: Manchester Central Grammar School for Boys
« Reply #42 on: 00:52:27, 28/12/15 »
Hope to post a photo. Parrswood last days at school buit see 150KB limit.
Have nothing that small to send.  Anybody wanting pics interested of 1946 intake.
Also have some pics elsewhere of 1947 intake. Please let me know how I can send or display.  Terry

Robert Jones

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Re: Manchester Central Grammar School for Boys
« Reply #43 on: 04:23:33, 12/02/16 »
What a marvellous site this is. I've just stumbled on it. I attended Central Grammar School for Boys from 1960-1967. Ended up in form 6X before leaving for university. Now live in Melbourne Australia. I still recall the class list (I think)

Antrobus, Arnold, Beirne, Clark, Daniels, Darby, Ford, Frost, Haslem, Jackson, Jackson, Jones, Kiernan, Liptrot, McGough, Milewczyk, Patchett, Payne, Perry, Robinson, Rooney, Shanks, Smith, Smith, Spicer, Stead, Thompson, Tryzinski, Webb, Winston

My worse teacher, Mr Dobbins, a sadist who put me off Physics forever.

My best teachers: Josh Harwood (Economics), Horrocks (Geography), Panter (English)

Great memories. Loved every minute. Also ran cross country with the coach being Mr Basketter (Chemistry teacher)


Frank Wharram

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Re: Manchester Central Grammar School for Boys
« Reply #44 on: 16:31:31, 16/02/16 »
I started at Manchester Central High School in 1945 and was there when it changed to Manchester Central Grammar School, probably about 1948/1949 after a major overhaul of education. We always called it Whitworth Street.  I left in 1949 and remember it well. We used to have to strain our ears to hear the teachers because of the racket made by railway horse and carts entering and leaving the old London Road Station goods yard on Whitworth Street over the cobble stones. Apart from the head and his deputy mentioned I remember 'Kipper feet' Sulby (Geography), 'Froggy' Wilkinson (French), 'Fud' Leaver (R.E.) who was often heard to say "you must not bring fud into the classroom". Aiden Walters was our PE teacher (a Rugby League international) and he and Phillip Rosser, an ex Cardiff Rugby Union Blue, took us for games. We played a mix of Rugby League and Union rules. Mr. Winterbottom (also French) was know as M. Hiver Derriere. Mr. Underwood and Mr. Rosser formed a scout troop (35th Manchester) and also took us away on holidays to the Lake District (CHA) and camping in Derbyshire and North Wales. In the entrance hall there was a door leading to the girls' school which was of course always locked but we used to take turns peeping through the keyhole until we were caught and had to attend the head's office. I guess I could ramble on but enough for now!