Author Topic: Cambert Lane Gorton in the 1960's and 1970's  (Read 18301 times)

Holmes

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Cambert Lane Gorton in the 1960's and 1970's
« on: 15:21:05, 29/01/14 »
I lived at 65 Cambert Lane, Gorton between 1960 and 1970.
It was a really lively area with lots of excellent shops, such as Stanley LUMB's Chemists Shop, Mrs OGDEN's Bakers, Mrs GIBLIN's Outdoor Beer Licence (an early version of today's Convenience Store) and Bill STURGESS's Butchers Shop.
Kids I grew up with in that area included Dave McKEOWN, Dave MOFFAT (who later became a Police Dog-Handler), twins Alan and Raymond HULSE (Alan later became an actor and appeared in Jewson adverts and in ITV's Coronation Street), Tommy and Eamonn GIBLIN, Dave KING, Brian HARDING and the girl who lived next door to me, Ruth DOWNIE, plus the lovely Lynn McKEOWN.
Nightlife for kids in the area consisted of monthly discos at Gorton Congregational Church on Cambert Lane or occasional trips to the Twisted Wheel or the Oasis Club in Manchester when the 1960's really took off with the Beatles era.
The nearest parks were Gorton Park off Hyde Road, opposite the Belle Vue Lake (before it was filled in and had the Belle Vue Granada Bowling Alley built on it), and Peter Pan Park off Chapman Street,
It was a great area and someone out there must have been part of it.
It would be nice to hear from you.
John Holmes (66 years) Lincolnshire.
 


davo

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Re: Cambert Lane Gorton in the 1960's and 1970's
« Reply #1 on: 00:14:13, 19/02/14 »
Hello John,
I remember going to Peter Pan Park once or twice when exploring other parts of Gorton. My grandfather used to be a 'Parkie' at Gorton Park. Most of my time was spent around Sunnybrow Park as a kid and the old Army Camp near Mellands Playing Fields, where we used to fight off 'the Jerries'.
Can't find a reference to Peter Pan Park but I have found a pic of King George playing field. Could this be another name for PPP? Do you remember a railway footbridge called 'The Bird Cage'.
Here is a link to old pics from all over Manchester ... enjoy.

http://images.manchester.gov.uk/index.php?session=pass

Adsum

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Re: Cambert Lane Gorton in the 1960's and 1970's
« Reply #2 on: 12:22:00, 19/02/14 »

This may be of interest to some of you Gorton exiles.  :-\




http://www.knowhere.co.uk/Gorton/Greater-Manchester/Northern-England/info
We are all lying in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

Holmes

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Re: Cambert Lane Gorton in the 1960's and 1970's
« Reply #3 on: 08:58:07, 22/02/14 »
You are spot on about Peter Pan Park, that was always the locally known name for the park, I never heard anybody call it anything else, but it was not its real name.
I remember the Birdcage Bridge, it was in the Preston Street/Railway Street area between Gorton and Openshaw and was a 'caged-in' footbridge near to Gorton Tank.
Happy days playing in those places.

Manx

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Re: Cambert Lane Gorton in the 1960's and 1970's
« Reply #4 on: 11:40:19, 25/02/14 »
I also remember Mr Giblin, after leaving the shop she moved to Stretford, her shop was on the corner of Taylor Street/Cambert Lane.



A 1965 shot of the footbridge known locally as 'The Birdcage' south end of Widnes Street built around 1900. Widnes Street would have previously been Wellington Street which cut across whitworth Street from Ashton Old Road.



As a young lad on the top deck of the bus heading towards Ashton, i remember looking down in wonder at the brand new trains that would travel between the terraced houses and across Ashton Old Road. A man would stand in the road waving his red flag and blowing his whistle (very loud) - when all traffic was still he would signal the train which came from Gorton Tank, to cross from Redby Street (late: Derby Street) then into Wood Street (Lord Wolseley pub on Corner) and enter into the English Steel Corp'n Works on North Street for further fitment work.

Lines crossing Ashton Old Road...



English Steel Corp'n Works...



The trains came within a few feet of the houses front doors, the disused tracks were left in place for many years after the demise of the steam train.

« Last Edit: 15:13:54, 25/07/14 by Chris »

Pot Shop

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Re: Cambert Lane Gorton in the 1960's and 1970's
« Reply #5 on: 22:38:24, 31/08/14 »
Cambert Lane was previously called Church Lane, as it ran up to St James's.

I recall that the off-licence shown in the photo on the corner of Taylor Street was run by a Mr Quirk in the 1950s, and I knew his son, Stewart.

More or less opposite the entrance to Taylor Street was an Army Surplus shop where I used to spend a lot of my pocket money

Down at the Hyde Road junction there was a barber called Mr Sparks, who we called "Sparky".

We lived on Hyde Road near the junction with Haddon Street, where my mum ran a hardware shop. Haddon Street was renamed Harley Street I think, and my dad had a garage behind some houses on Church (Cambert) Lane near the railway line, where he kept his Levis motor bike with a sidecar.

Adsum

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Re: Cambert Lane Gorton in the 1960's and 1970's
« Reply #6 on: 08:57:40, 01/09/14 »
One of Manchester first library's was located in The Cambert lane area of Gorton. It is known as the St. James library which dates from the mid 1500s and can be seen in the right hand corner of the room close to the window. It comprises of a large oak chest. The front is hinged and when opened there are a couple of shelves of books, all chained to the inside of the cabinet, so presumably one had to read the books in situ. However I doubt many of the residents of the area took advantage of the library back then because the books are nearly all written in Latin or German.  ??? The table desk in the alcove is where Marx and Engels used to sit and write some of their most famous works.  The St. James library can be seen in the reading room of Chethams library, which I have mentioned before is The oldest surviving public library in the country, and as such is open to the public. Well worth a visit if you are in the area.



« Last Edit: 09:05:44, 01/09/14 by Adsum »
We are all lying in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.

Lyn

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Re: Cambert Lane Gorton in the 1960's and 1970's
« Reply #7 on: 11:10:29, 03/04/16 »
Hi I grew up in South Street Openshaw and used to roller skate down the birdcage bridge - have very good memories of spending time playing and getting a few bruises!!  Anyone remember the Holt family??

NorthWalesAce

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Re: Cambert Lane Gorton in the 1960's and 1970's
« Reply #8 on: 10:34:29, 10/08/16 »
Does anyone know how the numbering went on Cambert Lane? My nanna, grandad, mum and I lived at 29 (last house before the railway bridge) in the late 60's early 70's. Which makes sense looking at an old Ordnance Survey map of the area as No1 would have been on the corner of Taylor Street. Someone on here says they lived at No65 though - how did the numbering work? Can anyone help please?
"Believe only half of what you see and nothing that you hear." E.A. Poe.

Hideaway69

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Re: Cambert Lane Gorton in the 1960's and 1970's
« Reply #9 on: 21:22:31, 10/08/16 »
Does anyone know how the numbering went on Cambert Lane?  how did the numbering work? Can anyone help please?


The odd numbers 1-165 were on the Left side, even numbers 4-160 were on the Right side (Source: 1969 Slaters Directory)

I Started Out with Nothing and I Still Got Most of It Left

NorthWalesAce

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Re: Cambert Lane Gorton in the 1960's and 1970's
« Reply #10 on: 10:43:13, 11/08/16 »

The odd numbers 1-165 were on the Left side, even numbers 4-160 were on the Right side (Source: 1969 Slaters Directory)


Thank you Hideaway69. If our house was No.29 and the numbers increased towards Gorton Lane, then where were Nos. 1-27? Our house was first after the railway, before that and round the corner is Crossley Street. Any ideas?
"Believe only half of what you see and nothing that you hear." E.A. Poe.

Hideaway69

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Re: Cambert Lane Gorton in the 1960's and 1970's
« Reply #11 on: 14:43:59, 11/08/16 »

Thank you Hideaway69. If our house was No.29 and the numbers increased towards Gorton Lane, then where were Nos. 1-27? Our house was first after the railway, before that and round the corner is Crossley Street. Any ideas?


Not knowing the area puts me at a disadvantage, according to the directory Nos 1-17 ran to Crossley Street, then No 19 ran to Carlton Terrace, Nos 21-57 ran to Taylor Street, I could list all the streets that crossed Cambert Lane but that might add to the confusion, however I am willing to answer any more questions you may have.
I Started Out with Nothing and I Still Got Most of It Left

NorthWalesAce

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Re: Cambert Lane Gorton in the 1960's and 1970's
« Reply #12 on: 15:01:27, 11/08/16 »

Not knowing the area puts me at a disadvantage, according to the directory Nos 1-17 ran to Crossley Street, then No 19 ran to Carlton Terrace, Nos 21-57 ran to Taylor Street, I could list all the streets that crossed Cambert Lane but that might add to the confusion, however I am willing to answer any more questions you may have.


Again, many thanks Hideaway69. The maps I have of the area are from 1916 and 1933 and neither tally with Slater's Directory of 1969 with the number of dwellings. I have found another map of the area from 1971 but it hasn't arrived yet - this one may shed some more light on it.
"Believe only half of what you see and nothing that you hear." E.A. Poe.

Hideaway69

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Re: Cambert Lane Gorton in the 1960's and 1970's
« Reply #13 on: 15:15:37, 11/08/16 »
No problem NWA, if it's of any use,  I could tell you who your neighbours were in 1969  ;)
I Started Out with Nothing and I Still Got Most of It Left

NorthWalesAce

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Re: Cambert Lane Gorton in the 1960's and 1970's
« Reply #14 on: 16:20:17, 11/08/16 »
No problem NWA, if it's of any use,  I could tell you who your neighbours were in 1969  ;)


Wow! I can't recall the next door neighbour, but I remember a Mrs. Wilson and her son Geoffrey lived at possibly 33.
"Believe only half of what you see and nothing that you hear." E.A. Poe.