Author Topic: Sisters of Charity Convent - 85, Rumford Street, Chorlton-upon-Medlock  (Read 3764 times)

MikeD44

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
I am looking into my family history and, specifically, for info about my maternal grandmother, whom I never met. I have discovered that, according to the Census of 1911, she was living ( as an 'inmate') in this Convent/Girls' Home as a 'Domestic Student'. The Home was, at that time, headed by Sister Josephine Bilsborrow.


I know nothing about when she entered the Home, or why, or when she left it....I don't know how exactly her status as 'inmate' differed from that of other girls there at the time who were described as 'boarders'. I believe the actual premises involved here were demolished some time ago and the area is now part of Manchester University, and I cannot find anywhere where I might get information about either my grandmother or the Home itself.


I would really appreciate any information on this subject which anyone might have, however little - many thanks.

MargaretB

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 292
Their full name was Sisters of Charity of St Vincent de Paul.  I have found this website and note they now prefer to call themselves Daughters of Charity etc.

http://www.daughtersofcharity.org.uk/   There is a link on there to contact them and hopefully they could give you more information.

I lived on Rumford Street and remember the convent very well but wasn't born until 1952 so do not know anything about 'inmates' rather than 'boarders'.  The convent fronted on to Rumford Street and the girls' hostel fronted on to Upper Brook Street.  We could go from the convent to the boarders via the garden of course.  I think it was mostly young girls coming over from Ireland who needed somewhere safe to stay until they were able to afford to establish their own household. 

When the convent was demolished the nuns were spread out around the country and some of them went to the new convent and hostel on Hathersage Road, across from the baths.  One of my friends lived in the hostel for a short while and that fronted on to Anson Road.  No idea if they are still in those buildings though.

Check out the website and see if they is any of them near where you are and take it from there.

Good luck.

MikeD44

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
Many thanks for your useful, and very prompt, response to my post Margaret; it's much appreciated and I have already learned something I didn't know.


I shall certainly look at the website you've mentioned and see if I can find anything of use there.....watch this space!

celeste

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 120700
Hi Mike and welcome to the forum

You can post this on the Genealogy thread as well

 O0
All that's necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing

Neil Roland

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 3
hello,
my grandparents lived on Rumford Street from around 1905 to 1960 when it was purchased by the university to be knocked down.  They were called Roland, and lived at no 75. My grandfather knew the Convent, and my father, who died in June 2020 at the age of 93 talked about it when I was writing his memoirs.  If you would like to know of his memories of it, I'd be happy to help.    Neil Roland.

MikeD44

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
Hi Neil - as you can see Iíve not been on this site for some time and have only tonight read your post. Iím not sure whether you will read this note but, if you do, I would be very interested to know more about your fathers memories of the Home. Many thanks, Mike

Neil Roland

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 3
hi Mike,
Good to hear from you.  What I know from my late father, is that he lived at 75 Rumford Street. My grandfather had bought the house in around 1917 and they lived there until it was compulsorily purchased in 1960.
My grandfather had his furrier business at their home, and my father said when he was a child, he and his father would walk past the convent, and at one point in the 1930s, a group of girls arrived from Spain. They had actually come from Guernica. They were being looked after at the convent, but they were never let out and my grandfather felt very sorry for them. He boutht them ice creams, and stood there handing them through the almost closed tall gates, until a nun started screaming at him.


My grandfather was on friendly terms with the priest there, and he came to tea at my grandfather's.  My aunt Ruth, who is in her mid 80s, lives in Melbourne. She was born on Rumford Street in around 1936 and will remember it.  my no is 07792 365 437 is you feel I might be of any use to you with any further information.
best
Neil Roland

MikeD44

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
Good evening Neil - thank you so much for your response to my recent postÖit was really interesting to read of your dadís recollections of the Convent from so long ago.
Iíve now reconciled myself to the fact that Iím not ever going to know when my grandmother entered the Home (even though I know the Census shows her there in 1911), under what circumstances she entered it or when she leftÖ.with the Home closed and the building itself demolished Iím sure whatever records were kept have long since disappeared.
Despite this, Iím pleased to have been able to learn something about how the Home was part of the local
community and, hopefully, it helped the girls who spent time there. Thanks you again for your help Iím this regard.

andy13

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
My grandmother told me that the street adjoining the convent had wooden cobbles. She said that there were people inside who were ill and the horse-drawn transport made less noise there.

Elliot Gee

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 2
Hello. I found this conversation by chance & wondered if anyone knew of a Margaret Mary Henry. I believe she lived on Rumford Street in the 1940's perhaps at number 50.


Would love to hear from anyone who may have known her or her family around that time. Thank you & best wishes. Elliot.