Author Topic: Manchester Central Grammar School for Boys  (Read 93666 times)

Tom

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 22
Re: Manchester Central Grammar School for Boys
« Reply #240 on: 21:05:58, 08/02/21 »
I remember Mr Judson (Juddie). He had a little dog which was looked after by Miss Rigby, the Bursar or Miss Hunt her assistant. He taught maths but like many retired teachers did what he could. Many may remember Dickie Trueblood. Usually filled in for RE. Mostly told us about his WW1 army life ,India etc. Most memorably he described how in WW1 the school was used as a hospital. He described how he joined up, was sent to France ,got wounded and ended up in a hospital bed in his old classroom! B  W Tom H. School Captain 60-61.

Spicer

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 21
Re: Manchester Central Grammar School for Boys
« Reply #241 on: 00:40:21, 10/02/21 »
OK here's Whitworth Street at the time we were there.I can see the little yard where I had my fight....and the basement windows where Rauke did his dirty deeds.

Spicer

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 21
Re: Manchester Central Grammar School for Boys
« Reply #242 on: 01:33:27, 10/02/21 »
It was skipping ParrsWood, lunch at Henry's and a movie at the cinephone.  ::) ::)

Spicer

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 21
Re: Manchester Central Grammar School for Boys
« Reply #243 on: 17:09:24, 11/02/21 »
This was around 1963. Don't know the class

Spicer

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 21
Re: Manchester Central Grammar School for Boys
« Reply #244 on: 17:25:42, 11/02/21 »
Here's a nice one from Whitworth Street around 1959

Spicer

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 21
Re: Manchester Central Grammar School for Boys
« Reply #245 on: 01:02:38, 12/02/21 »
This is Mr. Thomas I believe....long time ago for me to remember

Spicer

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 21
Re: Manchester Central Grammar School for Boys
« Reply #246 on: 18:50:41, 12/02/21 »
I think this is Bill Lawes around 1962

Peter Jackson

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 1
Re: Manchester Central Grammar School for Boys
« Reply #247 on: 17:19:13, 10/04/21 »
Hi there.  Yes, I recognise Mr Thomas, my old English teacher, from your photograph.  My name is Peter Jackson, I was a pupil at MCGS from 1960-1967 (one year at Whitworth Street and the rest of the time at Kirkmanshulme Lane) but I only discovered this interesting site yesterday!

I seem to remember you (sorry to be vague) but I did switch classes, I started somewhere at Whitworth St and ended up in 4X and 6C in the 'new' premises (I think -  it was a very long time ago!)

I did notice some old posts - circa 2016 - from Robert Jones and David Arnold who were my classmates for several years, and I remember (as pals and colleagues) Alan Milewczyk (I was later to be the 'best man' at his wedding, circa 1971 in Cardiff) Stewart McGough (who worked, much later, as an architect on the Millennium Dome project - and whom I met for a brief time some 18 years ago)  Colin Jackson (we travelled around Europe by train in the late 60s) and Steven Smith, who I remembered marrying a nice young lady called Veronica soon after they had left school.  But I have lost touch with everyone.

I have fond memories of MCGS but I remember making 2 long bus journeys to school and 2 back home to West Didsbury, every day.  And there were days when we would walk home for a good portion of the journey as the 'pea soup' fog descended on Greater Manchester!  I had my fair share of caning - at the hands of Messrs de La Perelle, Caldbeck and others.  But it was a regular occurrence for many then, and I probably deserved it!   
Mr Caldbeck, the woodwork/metalwork teacher, and I never saw eye to eye.  I was probably one of his worst students.  Regularly I would receive some punishment - including the cane - until I discovered that Mr C was a patient of my father who had a dental practice on Lapwing Lane, West Didsbury.  Armed with this information I used it as a shield, and I was spared the cane forever!  Presumably the fear of receiving short shrift at the hands of the dentist far outweighed the pleasure of applying the cane.

I remember Arthur Panter (English) - he was a nice bloke and helped me achieve a good grade in my A level.  I remember Albert Winterbottom, and the occasion when some of us (I have conveniently forgotten who!) sent a removal van to his house.  It had been booked with the express request 'make it a large one please as I have a grand piano.'   There were several terrified pupils one day when at the end of a French lesson Mr W told my class 'I know what you have done to me, and I shall make you pay for it.'   Fortunately, it became clear later that he said exactly the same thing to the other classes whom he taught.

I also have good memories of Mr (Robert) Stellfox.  Physics teacher. He was quite young, and fairly shy.  We were cruel.  When he turned his back to the class to write on the blackboard we would start to sing the Susan Maughan hit song 'I want to be Bobby's Girl'  and quickly stop when he turned around  - always red faced.

I went on to study Law at Birmingham University in the autumn of 1967 and I had a whale of a time.  I joined several societies, drew cartoons for the Uni newspaper 'Redbrick' and organised some interesting debates, including one between Enoch Powell and Dame Shirley Williams, and a Uni colleague/pal of mine was Perry Christie who returned to the Bahamas and became Prime Minister there.  Good stuff Perry.  For my part I became disenchanted with Law and eventually packed it in and started a business selling old coins and related antiques.  A childhood quirky passion which has served me reasonably well for the past 51 years!  And I am probably now at an age (nearly 72) where nobody would employ me!

So all this is pure nostalgia.  I did spend a few months in 1986 living in San Diego, and I have travelled the world, but I have lived for the rest of the time in Cheshire, between Wilmslow and Macclesfield with my long suffering wife and three boys ( 2 of whom are home from Uni off-and-on due to the Covid restrictions).  I also have a daughter from a previous marriage.  She has a family in Wilmslow but is employed by a London company.

Sad that MCGS is no more, but we all have our memories eh !?






konparde

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 1
Re: Manchester Central Grammar School for Boys
« Reply #248 on: 23:51:47, 15/04/21 »
I was at Central from 1966 to1973, the last year of the grammar school intake, and the photograph of Bill Lawes made me chuckle. There was nothing easier to deflect Curly Bill from teaching French than to mention the War. He told us about fishing drunken soldiers out of giants vats of calvados in Normandy and how you could always tell a genuine D-day veteran - they were issued with rope-soled galoshes to walk on the wet sand. He had no time for the Belgians who fired on allied troops trying to liberate them but seemed to have spent as much time developing a love of French food and wine as he did fighting. His stories were generally wasted on us as immature teenagers but it is funny how i can still remember them almost 50 years later. Steve (Zip) Nolan

Ken Langford

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 1
Re: Manchester Central Grammar School for Boys
« Reply #249 on: 19:56:32, 18/04/21 »
Was at Whitworth St. 1954-59 and wanted to mention my geography teacher, Jos Horrocks. In 1955, he took a group of us from London Rd. Station to Hayfield from where we walked up Kinder Downfall onto Kinder Plateau (with haversacks, stout shoes, and a packamac - remember them?). It was only 4 yrs after the establishment of the first national park in 1951 which was 70 yrs ago this weekend. The impression it made on me started a whole new life in the outdoors - climbing, pot holing, rambling, orienteering and canoeing. After 15 years as an international canoe slalomist, I became National Team Coach and an Olympic Coach.
From small beginnings. RIP Jos Horrocks. Fondly remembered.

rbsuper

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 1
Re: Manchester Central Grammar School for Boys
« Reply #250 on: 13:38:44, 15/05/21 »
Hi guys.
I'm Richard Bradshaw and I was at Central Grammar between '65 & '70.
Anyone on this forum who was in class 1P, then 2C, 3C etc.
Let me know and we can have a chat


Brian Ferguson

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
Re: Manchester Central Grammar School for Boys
« Reply #251 on: 18:42:16, 24/05/21 »
No Nobis Domine !  ;D ;D   Still don't know what it means.


Non nobis domine......means....not to us, Lord.....as in Not unto us o Lord....the praise and glory be of any deed or word blah blah

Brian Ferguson

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
Re: Manchester Central Grammar School for Boys
« Reply #252 on: 18:44:58, 24/05/21 »
Who was the Russian guy who rode his bike to school in Kirky Lane sometime between 1960 and 67 ?


I think that was Dr Sutcliffe (possibly not his birth name)....he taught my brother Russian. Did a good job as Alan went to Cambridge (Downing) and got a starred first.

Mcgough

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 1
Re: Manchester Central Grammar School for Boys
« Reply #253 on: 08:41:45, 09/06/21 »
Do I owe anybody any money? No? Good.
In which case Iíll own up to being one of the survivors of this notorious institution.
60 to 67.
Thanks Alan and Peter for topping and tailing a fascinating read. Itís all true.
My memory is now engaged and will no doubt reveal embarrasing rememberances to add to your own. Good wishes to you all.
Stewart

RoyM

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 1
Re: Manchester Central Grammar School for Boys
« Reply #254 on: 23:29:43, 20/06/21 »
Hi all, I'm Roy McLoughlin and started at Whitworth Street in 1959, Mr Wyeth's class. After one year moved to the new building and left in 1963. I liked cross country running and still do marathons.
« Last Edit: 23:36:33, 20/06/21 by RoyM »


 

Terms of Use†††† Privacy Policy